March Madness | Poetry Prompt

In the U.S. March Madness is linked to NCAA Men’s basketball. Here, we’re going to do something a little different. Let’s focus more on the madness in that phrase.

Let’s take Spring Fever to its next level.

Your mission- Write a poem about someone living through a different kind of March madness. Focus on the person losing something in life, whether it’s a relationship, a tree, a fish, etc. Write it and make your words count. Remember every post linked up here has a possibility for publication in the 2016 Anthology.

Write fearlessly, invite your friends, and happy writing!

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Wake Up a Woman Wordle

It’s time to play with another poet’s words…mine! I took words from my first book, Wake Up a WomanI hope you enjoy them and find them inspiring!

wordle5

Here are your words:

static
woman
kindling
embracing
banister
vain
clasp
curtains
gunshot
stubborn
relative
ruins
sprung

And have you considered submitting to our Write for Us segment? We’d love to feature your work here on The Reverie! Click here for more information…

Good luck and have fun!

Remember, all entries must be linked back to this post with a pingback or by commenting.

Shaping of an Angry Black Woman Wordle

It’s time for a new wordle! This week, I’ve taken words from one of our editor’s books, The Shaping of an Angry Black Woman  by Tamara Woods. There is no set amount of words you have to use, and you can use any form of the word listed below (plural, past tense, etc.)

wordle4

Here are you words:

drippings
splinters
fickle
barcode
articulate
quivering
accusing
lipstick
DNA
jail
witches
kiss
mimicry

To check out Tamara Woods’ book, click here!

Good luck and have fun!

Remember, all entries must be linked back to this post with a pingback or by commenting.

Daddy Issues: Poetry Prompt

Next Sunday is Father’s Day in the United States. Let’s talk about some father/daughter, father/son relationships. They can be as dysfunctional as you want or not at all. Memories of two characters, memories of your own, a pretend or real scenario, a sketch of the father you’d like to be one day, of the father you are…the list goes on. Let your imagination be your guide. I’m so interested in seeing what you guys come up with!

Make sure share it in the comments so we can all bask in your words.

Check out what each is doing and share! Let’s build this community. All links will be added to this year’s digest.

Have you considered submitting to our Write for Us segment? We’d love to feature your work here on The Reverie! Click here for more information

Have fun and share this post

Submitting poetry | Let’s Talk About It

Articles and blog posts I can submit to anyone. At anytime. It doesn’t hurt nearly as much. I don’t hesitate. I’m never afraid. If rejection happens, it’s just happens. I shake it off, go on to the next one.

When it comes to poetry, it’s like I’m over someone my sensitive underbelly to be poked and prodded. It’s too personal. Too inherently me. Even when it doesn’t seem like it’s about me, I leave a trace of myself on the pages. Rejection becomes a major factor. Fear holds me back. I push through it, because I feel like the end result could make it worth it.

But the nerves never fade.

What about you? Does submitting poetry fill you with fear? How do you push past it? Tell me about it in the comments.

If you want to try to get past that fear, every Thursday we post a publishing opportunity. We try to cover different types of publications looking for different kinds of poetry.

This week’s prompt is to write something that’s happy. Check it out here.

What emotions do you write from? | Let’s Talk About It

When I initially started writing poetry, it was because of a boy. Not the happy bits where I was so excited to get to know him and everything was magical. The hard parts where I felt like he’d ripped open my chest, snatched out my heart, and bludgeoned it with a brick.

Oh teenage angst, how I don’t miss thee.

But this did seem to start a precedent for me. I tend to draw on the sadder, darker moments for poetry. It helps me to process the moment, sure, but it also seems like an easier well for me to draw.

What about you? Do you write more about sad moments? Are the happy things that make your pen move for your verses? Or are emotions more of a part of the journey rather than a destination for your poetry?

If you have a poem that’s about a goodbye, be sure to share it for this week’s prompt.