Arsenic Lobster| Publishing Opportunity

Part of what we do here at The Reverie Journal is to tell you about opportunities to share your work.

Of course, we certainly hope you’ll still consider submitting with us for our magazine, anthology, or Write for Us submissions.

Today, let us introduce you to Arsenic Lobster. It seeks poems that are, “…timeless, rich in imagery, and edgy; seeking elegant emotion, articulate experiment. Be compelled to write.”

Learn more about their submission guidelines here.

Email: lobster@magere.com
Contact: Does not list specific contact: Susan Yount is Editor/Publisher

 

Ashes

Poetry on The Reverie Journal blog.

To sweeten the dish, add salt. To bear the pain,
render the insoluble. She envied

the past its incursions, yet the past yields to all,
avoidance to acceptance, trees to smoke.

My mother brought to this country a token of her death to come.

Now it sits on my shelf bearing implements of music.
In her last days I played Sakura on the mandolin,

trusting that she might find comfort
in the blossoms fluttering through the failing notes,

a return to mornings
of tea and rice, of
warmth and paper walls and deep laughter.

Today the rain spells forgive

and every idea becomes form, every shadow a symptom,
each gesture a word, a naming in silence.

Scatter me in air I’ve never breathed.


 

Robert Okaji lives in Texas. “Ashes” was featured on Extract(s) and is included in his chapbook, If Your Matter Could Reform, to be released in April 2015, as Dink Press’s first offering in its National Poetry Month Series. You can find him at his blog.

The Adirondack Review | Publishing Opportunity

Part of what we do here at The Reverie Journal is to tell you about opportunities to share your work.

Of course, we certainly hope you’ll still consider submitting with us for our magazine, anthology, or Write for Us submissions.

Today, let us introduce you to Albatross. The name is a nod from Coleridge’s poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “consider the albatross a symbol for the environment.” This they interpret as they are more biased toward poems about the environment. They “publish mostly free verse and prefer narrative styles.”

Learn more about their submission policy here.

Email: rsmyth@anabiosis-press.org
Contact: Editor: Richard Smyth
Address: The Anabiosis Press
2 South New St.
Bradford, MA 01835

I Love Me, I Love Me Not

This weekend we’re celebrating one of those holidays people either love, or love to hate.

But in the spirit of love and romance and all those ooey-gooey feelings, I want you to write a love poem.

Hold on.

It’s not going to be that easy.

I want to challenge you to write a love poem from someone who loves you’s perspective. Did you catch that? That means a husband, girlfriend, partner, mother, grandfather, child, best friend, whoever you have in this world that loves you…You are going to write a love poem…to yourself…as if it were written by them.

Sound difficult? It is. It’s never easy to put yourself into someone else’s voice and try to write from their standpoint.

It’s even harder to write love poetry about yourself.

But I think you can do it. I KNOW you can do it.

And have you considered submitting to our Write for Us segment? We’d love to feature your work here on The Reverie! Click here for more information

Remember, all entries must be linked back to this post with a pingback or by commenting by Friday at midnight EST. Saturday is the vote and Sunday the winner will be featured.

Photo Credit: the-psycrothic on deviantart

The Writer in My Head

The writer in my head has a name
But it is not mine
The person I saw buried six feet under
Lives behind my soulful eyes
In my blood I feel him
As I write the words that he has given me
I feel my feet hit the ground
But its to his kind beat
He is a leaf cascading to the ground
as I watch it with the eyes he gave me
He is the thought in my head
As I write down these words
And sing his mournful song


I like to keep my blog anonymous, as there is personal luggage on it that shouldn’t have a name attached to it. I write mostly about what I see and what inspires me. I believe that simplicity has more complexity than people may realize. My poems aim to extract the complexity and show the beauty in the rubble. The poem I submitted is about the person who inspired me and who continues to posthumously. You can find more of WordsAreDeadly’s work on their blog, here.

Photo credit: xmansonettex on deviantart / Design credit: Laura A. Lord

I Am My Mother’s Daughter

I am my mother’s daughter
I save glass jars from peppers and peaches
To use throughout the house for holding things
Like buttons, seeds, and leftovers.

I stay up late after the house is quiet
Finishing projects in sewing and words
Away from the darling needy children
And alone with the depths of my thoughts.

When I want to learn something
I read books about astronomy and birds
I know the knowledge will not help me at work
Or at home, but I want to know anyway.

I am my mother’s daughter because
I know there is no harm in knowing about
The world away from my own
Even if I never see it.


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAElizabeth N. Love is a resident of Kansas, where the blue sky meets a flat horizon. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing from the University of Kansas and writes science fiction as well as poetry. When not writing, she is found chauffeuring two children to activities, cooking homemade meals, and practicing creativity in music, drawing, and needlework. You can learn more about her on her blog, here.

Photo credit: noach-b on deviantart / Design credit: Laura A. Lord

The Faceless Man

The Faceless Man poetry prompt http://thereveriejournal.com

The Faceless Man poetry prompt http://thereveriejournal.com

At first the idea was to do something about the weather, but given what the East Coast is possibly facing, maybe something entirely different is more apropos.

Above you have a mystery man. Who is he? He is anyone you want him to be. The only caveat is: he’s got to be a little…well…different. Interesting. It’s your choice in what makes him so unusual. Spin me a story about the faceless man.

Here’s a list of words to get you in the mood. Use three of these, if you please:

Vanished
Mysterious
Unknown
Alien
Estranged
Foreign
Forbidden
Bizarre
Striking
Singular
Grotesque
Outrageous

This video may help you along:

As with last week, I’ll be tweeting your poetry and sharing among social media sites. If you have any writerly friends who are looking for a prompt, send them my way. There’s no voting, but there is plenty of sharing and support. Let’s grow this community together.